The New Boy! Welcome Nick Wale!

 

 

Roberts HIT

Nick Wale turned “Reprisal: The Eagle Rises” into a hit overnight.

Interview undertaken by interviewer  Alex Laybourne and reblogged on several sites including http://www.nickwale.org

Ever hear the song “Hungry Like The Wolf”? Well, this guy is hungry for the hits. It becomes a struggle when you have written a book—a good book, no less! What do you do? You can hire some PR guy or girl who takes thousands off you and does nothing. You can pretend you wrote the book for your family. You can say that “there’s no money to be made in writing.” You can be the art writer with a chip on your shoulder.

You should meet the “Hitmaker.” He has just sailed into the top twenty on Amazon, again, with “Reprisal! The Eagle Rises.” The writer is Cliff Roberts, and the PR is Nick Wale. I caught him for an interview! What sells? Let’s get some free advice from a guy near the top of the pile.

Q) Hi, Nick, how are you taking to being the “Hitmaker”?

A) Hola! Who the hell came up with that? I thought that was an album by Burt Bacharach. I like it though. The “Hitmaker” is doing just fine… Just getting by, I guess.

Q) Modest? You are currently in the top twenty again? Is that just getting by?

A) No, Cliff Roberts is in the top twenty. Nick Wale, Hitmaker, or whatever you call him is still the dude who promotes books.

Q) Let me ask you—how do you take to all the stuff you’ve been called? You were “King of the Author Interviews,” then you were “Winner Wale,” and now you get called the “Hitmaker.”

A) I don’t really take it. It just is. I don’t let that stuff get out of proportion. If people believed half the hype in the world, we would all be driving Gremlins.

Q) So, what is a hit book?

A) A hit book sells. It sells because it has something about it. It doesn’t have to be perfectly edited, it doesn’t have to be THAT commercial. It just has to have that IT factor. It catches on. The trick for a PR is to identify WHAT will make it sell, and then exploit that. For Roberts, it’s the fact that he writes excellent stories. For Chris Keys, it was an eye for detail. Terry Irving has a unique way of writing. It’s different for everybody. All books aren’t born equal. A good PR realises that each book will have weaknesses, and people will pick on that. You just have to work hard to make sure the good stuff gets to the majority of people.

Q) What do you do that other PR services don’t do?

A) Nothing. I just do it with class, and I don’t make people take out mortgages to hire me. I don’t tell them that they will sell a million copies, either. I do what I can, and when the magic elves help me—it clicks! Don’t believe the hype when a PR agency tells you that if you spend ten thousand dollars you will have a hit. You probably won’t. A hit shouldn’t cost any more than time, patience, hard work and working with a professional who will charge you professional prices. The problem with the majority of PR services is simple—they don’t get hired that much—so the person who DOES hire them has to pay them a lot of money to make up for it.

Q) How often are you hired?

A) All the time! Results, a good eye for clients, a good list of authors, strong candidates for hit novels keep me in that magic thing called work. A good reputation helps. I think the biggest factor is that I just bring in the results—be it sales, strong interviews, opportunities, chart placings—whatever. I just bring them in.

Q) What should people look for in a PR?

A) Someone new, someone who doesn’t give you a spiel about how rich and successful they are. I was told by a great friend of mine, Jacob Singer, who is a top stock market analyst, “If you are told by someone that they have the tips to make you a million dollars—ask yourself—why aren’t they using them themselves?” That has always stuck with me. If someone is telling you how successful they are, question it. Look for evidence. I always try to tell my clients that anyone promising a number one tomorrow is lying through their teeth. Number ones take time.

Q) You are a conservative guy by nature, aren’t you?

A) Totally. I never rush into anything because that’s a good way to end up broke. I don’t rush, I don’t take people’s word for anything. I look at what they have done. I look at what they have achieved and where they are headed. I try to follow the example of a writer and businessman named Tom Blubaugh. Tom is a genius, but he never rushes into anything. He makes good decisions, and he makes them after giving them a lot of thought. I try to do the same. I ask myself, “Is this good for my business?” “Is this good for me?” and most importantly “Do I need this stress?”

Q) Did you get coached in the art of business?

A) No, not really. I just copied off successful people I know. I tried to see what worked for them. I worked for a writer called Mike Trahan, he was another guy who never rushed into anything. You had to explain things through and through. No funny business. Guess what? I took that to heart, and now I ask more questions than my clients. You can’t leave anything to chance.

Q) So, I guess you made mistakes, too?

A) Sure! I have passed up some great manuscripts. I have lost business through making mistakes. I have screwed up interviews. The important thing is that I got back up and tried again and again. I learnt from my mistakes, and that is what’s important. If something doesn’t work with your promotion—give it another shot! Try something else! Do anything, but don’t sit on your fanny wondering where it all went!

Q) How should people begin their promotional efforts?

A) Look at a budget. Look at what you can afford, and then look at what will sell your book best. Will it be a Facebook ad that will get you a new audience? Will you spend advertising money on your Facebook page? Will you buy an auto-tweeting client? Will you hire a PR? What will your budget allow you to do? Then look at where the market is… Are thrillers selling? Are memoirs? What is number one on Amazon? What does your book has that makes it stand out? Who are you? Do you havepersonality? What are your past experiences? Were you in the Service? You need to look at every angle. I will explain why.

The reason you need to look at every angle is simple. You need to know what groups you can join, military writers groups—for example. If you join one of these groups to promote your book—you will be more likely to be accepted if you have a military-themed book or background. You need to look at who you are and what you have to offer.

Q) What would you do with Joe Bloggs aged twenty-six with no job, a loan to pay for your services and a book about skateboarding?

A) I would get Joe on the youth groups, skateboarding groups. I would have him on webinars talking about skateboarding. He would be promoting his book the old fashioned way—with personality to an audience that wants to hear about his work. Not just spammed links all over the Internet. Joe would also be running a sample book; he would have professional interviews and double interviews with relevant people. Joe would be busy—too busy to remember that he has no job.

Q) Do you really think “spamming” is a bad idea?

A) Yes. It’s a bad idea all around because it ruins your reputation. You only get one reputation—bestselling writer or spammer? Your choice.

Q) How can you account for the success of “Reprisal! The Eagle Rises”?

A) I can’t. The readers can. Cliff Roberts and I have no idea why it took—we just did the right things. We promoted it the old fashioned wayand now it’s roaming around the top echelon of Amazon. Why did it hit? Where to flies go in winter? What happened to perms? Nobody knows, and frankly, nobody cares. You just have to do the right things to make the hits happen. Seriously, analyse yourself, your book and look where it will sell. Get yourself professional interviews, professional representation and exploit your books strengths. That’s how the magic happens. It worked for Lloyd Tackitt. I helped move 2900 of his books in one month. It happened for J.W. Northrup when his short stories went wild with sales. It happened for Cliff Roberts when he broke the top twenty on Amazon. It happened for Carol Bond. It can happen for you.

Q) Last question—where can people contact you?

A) Get to me via email at Nicholas.Wale (@) hotmail.co.uk or you can write to me at Nick (@) nickwale.org. You can also find me at my website www.nickwale.org . It will be a lot of fun meeting you!

Turn The Key To See Into The Mind Of Chris Keys….

I was asked the other day how I came up with the idea for One Mistake and to be honest the idea of a guy digging a hole in which to bury someone was the idea I had originally. Like most of my stories I start out writing about just a small part of the story and my imagination builds on it from there. I thought about why a guy was digging the hole, then what kind of hole was it, big/little. Then it went to how I would dig a hole to bury a body. I mean why else dig a hole?

It then morphed into a normal guy is pushed to his breaking point and so believing he has no choice, he plots out the perfect murder. Murder is a drastic step that gets a lot lip service in the heat of the moment, but is actually seldom committed. Yeah sure there are thousands murdered every year in America. But there are billions of people, so in contrast, the number of murders, though horrific all, are really quite small in the grand scheme. That’s probably why it intrigues us so much.

Tyler Stone is the neighbor you say hi to as you come back home from work or on the weekend while mowing the lawn. He’s the guy you play softball with or hang out at the bowling alley with. He’s not a monster, but he’s feeling trapped, and the acceptable solution in society’s eyes is simply too much for him. If he goes along with getting divorced it will strip him of his identity and everything he’s worked for. That’s something he can’t deal with.

I then thought about how he’d have to justify to himself, the killing of his wife and after lying convincingly to himself working up the courage to follow through, he finally accepts it’s wrong to do it. Only to justify it by believing its only wrong if he gets caught. Maybe he is a monster deep down inside, maybe we all are to some extent.

So Tyler, who obviously saw the divorce coming, long before the wife actually started acting out, begins planning for the perfect murder. He reads books, lots of books about murder and studies them to learn exactly what the murderer did that gave away the fact that he had killed someone.

Tyler plans the burial site, the cleanup, hunts for and finds the perfect murder weapon, prepares the murder scene, and sets the stage to commit the crime so that his alibi will shield him from suspicion. But even the best laid plans seldom survive the first minute of battle. It is one of the first lessons officer candidates learn at our nation’s military academies. Your enemy will never follow your battle plan. You have to be fluid and reactive, and never give up the initiative, but you will always have to make adjustments on the fly.

Tyler despite thinking he’d planned for nearly everything, discovers he hadn’t planned for hardly anything and is forced from the moment he initiates his plan to reevaluate and rethink everything. The one thing you cannot plan for, in its entirety, is what other people will do. Tyler finds this out the hard way and finds himself battling through one unplanned for challenge after another, all created by others. You’ll find yourself almost rooting for him to get away with it.

I found myself struggling along with Tyler to keep the mistakes to a minimum and keep the story believable. It was challenging thinking up what could possibly go wrong next, without turning it into a comedy.

Once I figured out Tyler would kill his wife, I then had to discover how he‘d avoid making that One Mistake that would get him caught. So when it came to the ending, I simply…Oh wait…I think maybe it would be best if you read that part for yourself. That way I’ll avoid the Mistake of giving it away and that would be truly tragic for me.

RIP Mike Mauss…. You Will Be Missed…

Mike Mauss was the author of a book called the “Unemployed Guys Guide to Unemployment”. Now, I guess, it’s a fact of life that we all die… Even an Ox has to die sometimes… But, when Terry Irving announced the death of his pseudonym… The world was shocked! Nobody suspected that the irrepressible Mr Mauss was in fact Terry Irving. I caught Terry for a quick chat during a break from writing his latest book. The book will be called “Warrior” and will be his best yet… He has already sold it to a publisher- so that tells me it’s going to be one helluva read!

Terry explains that Mike Mauss was a combination of the names of his beloved pets.

Q) What made you kill Mike Mauss, Terry?

A) Mike was a nice guy–although he did smoke cigars all the time, and not good ones but the ends of other people’s he’d pick up off the street. Despite that, he was good enough company and you need someone to hand with when you’re writing.

Q) You meant to kill him off? Surely, it wasn’t premeditated?

A) Not premeditated as such. I want to be as honest as possible. He had it coming. He was supposed to be building sales and instead he was out back in the hammock. I couldn’t get him to blog. I couldn’t get him to write agents. I couldn’t get him to do anything. Eventually, it began to eat away at me.

Q) Do you think all writers should consider killing their pseudonym at some point?

A) I don’t really know. John Le Carre has done fairly well.You’d think he’d get killed sooner than anyone. with all that spy stuff going on, and of course, Isaac Asimov could never have sold the Harry Potter series under his own name. He needed to be a woman, and don’t even let me start on George Sand….

Q) Was it tense living with Mike Mauss?

A) When you’re trying to sell a book about being unemployed and broke and you’re sponging off another writer. Well, the tension just keeps rising like a piano wire wrapped around a neck. tightening and tightening…

Q) Would you ever create another Mike?

A) what? Oh another guy? I’ve been considering trying a woman’s name and writing some of that paranormal romance. I’m not sure, thought. the women writers do sex so much better. I’d probably have a heart attack. I’m not sure a man would be allowed to write any of that stuff. I guess I could try Mousey Mikelson? Mouche de Mike? Mouse Le Chien?

Q) How about creating an erotica writer?

A) Michaela von Mauss? That could be cool but I’d have to write while taking a cold shower. Probably be hard on the laptop!!

Four time Emmy-award winning TV journalist Terry Irving has a new book out currently. The book is called “Full Circle” and tells of Terrys early life in the heady world of the early 70’s. Check it out now!